13 Days of Horror: Michael Myers in Halloween 1&2 (1978, 1981)

Michael MyersMichael Myers began the serial killer trope of the horror genre in 1978 when he was first featured in John Carpenter’s VERY independent film, Halloween. What made Halloween scary was not only what Michael Myers was capable of, but being reminded continually by his doctor, Dr. Loomis (Donald Pleasance), of the very evil Michael Myers was. The first Halloween film was frightening because we as an audience didn’t know why Michael Myers was targeting Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis). Nor were we sure whether she was going to survive the evening. Yet it was Halloween’s ending that made the film perfect for macabre horror; Michael Myers is shot six times and still manages to escape. This firstly showed audiences that Michael Myers was indestructible evil, but also created the aura that evil prevailed. It was a unique and frightening ending to an overall creepy film.

That is why Halloween 2 is the perfect compliment to the first film; Halloween 2 picks up exactly where the first film left off and completes the events of the evening. Halloween 2 veered into slasher film territory, but it functions well if it is watched immediately after its predecessor. Halloween 2 follows Laurie Strode to the hospital, where Michael Myers soon arrives to complete his mission of murdering her. What especially makes Halloween 2 worth watching is that the question of the “why” is answered, to which Dr. Loomis now has an understanding of Michael Myers’ motivations for the evening. Lastly, Halloween 2 gave the evening the perfect sense of finality, to which sequels after this film were never necessary. Halloween 2 ends the evening and the horror of Michael Myers, and that makes both films perfect for Halloween night viewing.

Halloween 2

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